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Nakamura, Gelfand & Ivanchuk Win In Tata Steel

  • SonofPearl
  • on 19.01.2012, 13:38.

Official Website Round 5 Report

With the two tournament leaders both settling for a draw in fifth-round action, the 500 euros set aside for the best game in Tata Steel’s Grandmaster Group A Thursday went to Israel’s Boris Gelfand for a victory with black over Sergey Karjakin of Russia.

The win, in 44 moves from a Najdorf, was nothing to write home about, Gelfand felt. “Sure, it was a good game,” he told reporters about his first victory in this year’s tournament, adding: “I think Sergey made a few incorrect moves. It’s always nice to win but, on the whole, I can’t say I’m really satisfied with my play so far.”

However, Ivan Sokolov, the Dutch GM responsible for awarding the prize - which is named after a former director of the Wijk-aan-Zee chess spectacular and funded by the municipalities of Velsen and Beverwijk – was full of praise for the Israeli GM’s performance. “It was a beautiful game, interesting and exciting. You’ve got to take into account that he won with black in a very difficult variation against a reputed theoretical connoisseur of the line,” Sokolov defended his choice.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Sergey Karjakin _Boris Gelfand.jpg

 

 

 

Hikaru Nakamura’s win in 34 moves with white from an English game against Czech GM David Navara, was “not bad either,” Sokolov said, but “Navara caved in much too early and too easily after his weak 18…Na6?, where 18…f5 19.Bxf5 Rxf5 would have restricted the damage to just a slightly worse position.”

Nakamura said he “would not call it an easy game,” however. “It’s just that I understood the position and the pawn structure in the opening and the middle game better than he did. He went for a plan that was a little bit dubious, which allowed me to increase the pressure, gradually improving my position. It was only in the late middle game that he made a few serious mistakes,” he said.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Hikaru Nakamura - David Navara.jpg

 

 

 

The win with black against Azerbaijan’s Vugar Gashimov with which Vassily Ivanchuk of the Ukraine put a stop to a rather disappointing series of four draws from the previous rounds did not qualify for the prize either, Sokolov said. “Gashimov made things too easy. His 13.g4 was probably overly enthusiastic and Chucky's reply 13…Nc4 gave him an early advantage.” Gashimov was “simply steamrollered” and his attempt to salvage a draw by giving his queen for two rooks failed miserably. “There were too many weaknesses in his position by then.” The Azeri resigned on his 35th move.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Vugar GAshimov - Vassily Ivanchuk.jpg

 

 

 

Levon Aronian settled for a quick draw after 31 moves with black from a Queen’s Gambit against Holland’s Loek van Wely. “It’s a long tournament,” he explained to reporters afterwards. “I didn’t feel like taking any risks in this round and decided to allow myself another rest day.” Van Wely, who was well prepared and had been playing rather quickly, said he “had hoped the guy would try some risky business, knowing that I hadn’t been playing any serious chess for a year. But unfortunately, he seemed content with the draw.”

Tata 2012 Round 5 Loek van Wely - Lev Aronian.jpg

 

 

 

The other front-runner, Norway’s Magnus Carlsen, played white in a King’s Indian against Dutch champion Anish Giri in Thursday’s round and tried hard but he, too, had to settle for a draw. It took a while longer, though, with the two players signing the peace only after 64 moves, when just the two kings were left on the board.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Magnus Carlsen - Anish Giri.jpg

 

 

 

 

Bulgaria’s Veselin Topalov and Azerbaijan’s Teimour Radjabov agreed to a draw after 28 uneventful moves from a Queen’s Gambit, while reigning U.S. champion Gata Kamsky and Fabiano Caruana reached the same result in 84 moves from a Ruy Lopez.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Teimour Radjabov - Veselin Topalov.jpg

 

 

 

Tata 2012 Round 5 Gata Kamsky - Fabiano Caruana.jpg

 

 

The standings in Group A after round 5:

Carlsen, Magnus  NOR  2835
Aronian, Levon  ARM  2805
Caruana, Fabiano  ITA  2736 3
Ivanchuk, Vassily  UKR  2766 3
Radjabov, Teimour  AZE  2773 3
Giri, Anish  NED  2714
Van Wely, Loek  NED  2692
Topalov, Veselin  BUL  2770
Nakamura, Hikaru  USA  2759
Gelfand, Boris  ISR  2739
Kamsky, Gata  USA  2732 2
Karjakin, Sergey  RUS  2769 2
Gashimov, Vugar  AZE  2761
Navara, David  CZE  2712 1

 

In Grandmaster Group B, the Piet-Zwart Prize of 250 euros went to veteran Jan Timman who downed fellow Dutchman Sipke Ernst with white in a Reti game. After Timman’s early positional pawn sacrifice, black never managed to escape from the pressure exerted on his position. At his 33rd, Ernst’s position was hopeless and rather than make another move, he resigned.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Jan Timman - Sipke Ernst.jpg

 

 

 

India’s Pentala Harikrishna remained on top of the standings in this group after a quiet draw with black in a Queen’s Gambit against Holland’s Erwin l’Ami. Russia’s Alexander Motylev defeated Kateryna Lahno of the Ukraine to move into the second spot, half a point behind Harikrishna.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Motylev - Lahno.jpg

 

 

The results for round 5 in Group B:

L'Ami, Erwin  ½-½  Harikrishna, Pentala
Timman, Jan H  1-0  Ernst, Sipke
Tiviakov, Sergei  ½-½  Nyzhnyk, Illya
Potkin, Vladimir  ½-½  Vocaturo, Daniele
Cmilyte, Viktorija  ½-½  Reinderman, Dimitri
Lahno, Kateryna  0-1  Motylev, Alexander
Harika, Dronavalli  0-1  Bruzon Batista, Lazaro


The standings in Group B after round 5:

Harikrishna, Pentala  IND  2665 4
Motylev, Alexander  RUS  2677
L'Ami, Erwin  NED  2596 3
Timman, Jan H  NED  2571 3
Tiviakov, Sergei  NED  2677
Reinderman, Dimitri  NED  2581
Nyzhnyk, Illya  UKR  2568
Bruzon Batista, Lazaro  CUB  2691
Vocaturo, Daniele  ITA  2545
Potkin, Vladimir  RUS  2684 2
Cmilyte, Viktorija  LTU  2503 2
Lahno, Kateryna  UKR  2557 2
Ernst, Sipke  NED  2606
Harika, Dronavalli  IND  2516

 

The 100 euros earmarked for the Piet-Zwart Prize in Grandmaster Group C had to be shared by India’s Baskaran Adhiban and England’s Matthew Sadler for their draw in 59 moves from a French Tarrasch. After a slow start with continuous pressure by the young Indian, the Englishman jumped on his first chance to activate his pieces, leading to a spectacular series of sacrifices and counter-sacrifices.

White is about to push his passed e-pawn, but black is just in time with 51...Ra2 52.Rg1 Rfa8! 53.e6 Bxg2! 54.Qxh6! (both 54.Rxg2? Rxg2 55.Kxg2 Qg6 56.Kf1 Ra1 and 54.exf7? Bd5 55.Qf2 Rxf2 56.Kg3 Rf3 57.Kh2 Bxf7 win for Black) 54...gxh6 55.exf7 Bd5 56.Kg3 Bxf7 and the game was drawn a few moves later.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Adhiban - Sadler.jpg

 

 

Russia’s Maxim Turov maintained his perfect score in this group with a win over Holland’s Lars Ootes. He was followed in second place by Sweden’s Hans Tikkanen, who downed Armenia’s Elina Danielan in 69 moves with black from a King’s Indian.

Tata 2012 Round 5 Turov - Ootes.jpg

 

 

Tata 2012 Round 5 Tikannen - Danielian.jpg

 

 

The results for round 5 in Group C:

Turov, Maxim  1-0  Ootes, Lars
Adhiban, Baskaran  ½-½  Sadler, Matthew D
Brandenburg, Daan  ½-½  Tania, Sachdev
Goudriaan, Etienne  0-1  Grover, Sahaj
Schut, Lisa  1-0  Haast, Anne
Paehtz, Elisabeth  ½-½  Hopman, Pieter
Danielian, Elina  0-1  Tikkanen, Hans

 

The standings in Group C after round 5:

Turov, Maxim  RUS  2645 5
Tikkanen, Hans  SWE  2549 4
Adhiban, Baskaran  IND  2561
Grover, Sahaj  IND  2532 3
Sadler, Matthew D  ENG  2660 3
Brandenburg, Daan  NED  2527
Goudriaan, Etienne  NED  2279
Schut, Lisa  NED  2290
Tania, Sachdev  IND  2411 2
Paehtz, Elisabeth  GER  2454 2
Ootes, Lars  NED  2326 2
Hopman, Pieter  NED  2342 1
Danielian, Elina  ARM  2490 1
Haast, Anne  NED  2290 1

 

Report and photos from the official website coverage. Videos by Freshmen media.

Czytano 9646 razy 26 komentarze
2 głosów

Komentarze


  • 3 lat temu

    Lawdoginator

    Naka won quickly today with the black pieces. He is back in form now. 

  • 3 lat temu

    eaglejorge

     22. Qxe8+ (?) in ivanchuk´s game, why did he gave up his queen like that.....weird, at least.  

  • 3 lat temu

    Arcturar

    Aronian is slowly climbing up to Magnus' rating; there is still an 18 point difference for now, but it is shrinking...:D

    Both are at least 37 points above Radjabov, who himself leads most of the "pro" pack by at least 15 points. Good job to him for winning today, by the way.

     

     

    But things are clearly starting to spread out; Aronian, Carlsen, and Kramnik really have a commanding lead over pretty much everyone else. Of course, Ivanchuk can be amazing at times but is overall too unstable. And Anand...well...I would like to see a good win from him first before I classify him again as a boss. Other than that, there really isn't too much competition..in a year or two Giri and Caruana will be up there, but it'll take a bit longer for them to be better than the current leaders.   

  • 3 lat temu

    StakeOut

    hey wandafish,  your circle illusion does really wierd torus apparition when scrplling up and down  Cool

  • 3 lat temu

    Lawdoginator

    Naka has roared back to life!  He is the Chess Zombie. 

  • 3 lat temu

    Lawdoginator

    Naka is on fire!  Two wins in a row!  He wants to defend his title at Tata Steel.  

  • 3 lat temu

    sunandthreestars

    What is the criteria for best game? Im not much fan of Nakamura and Ivanchuk but I found the game better.

    Disappointed with Topalov, after sometime away from tournaments I thought he would spark on this one.

  • 3 lat temu

    prab_013

    I agree that Carlsen did not conduct a fair play against Anish Giri.

  • 3 lat temu

    Aleksandr_II

    Go Chucky!

  • 3 lat temu

    gxtmfa

    SerbianChessmaster- you seem to hate Nakamura. I've seen a few posts of yours. What's the deal?

  • 3 lat temu

    gabrielconroy

    Naka - "I just understood the position - the pawn structure, piece play, the opening and the middlegame better than he did" - not much then!

  • 3 lat temu

    jesterville

    I enjoyed the Carlsen-Giri game the most. Magnus looked like he had a slight lead at one point, but Giri's attack was great. Why didn't Giri play 23...Nf2?...that looked interesting.

    At last the challenger to Anand wins a game...with black as well. Gelfand's play so far has not been impressive...but maybe he will step-up.

  • 3 lat temu

    wandafish

    youre going to sleep deeper and deeper and give me kitkat

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    i have a feeling he's going to win this tournament Smile

  • 3 lat temu

    EternalChess

    No one cares that Naka won, dont mention it.

    I even forgot he was in the tournament.

  • 3 lat temu

    DrKoala

    hikaru always seems to open with an english game

  • 3 lat temu

    goutham32kog

    man how cheeky and competitive both carlsen and giri really are!! Do they have to play those moves 60-64??

  • 3 lat temu

    ivanx00

    WOW!! Gelfand really brought his game for this round. And with the Sicilian!

  • 3 lat temu

    PHI33

    @thaskaiser The rook is often sacrificed in the Najdorf with Rxc3 to destroy the pawn structure around the king. This is not a crazy idea. Accepting Gelfand's sacrifice with Bxc5 would have been very dangerous, as the bishop on g7 would have no opposition, and all black's pieces would be bearing down on white's king position (The dark squares are very weak).

  • 3 lat temu

    Joost_NL

    lol @ eleazar777: you take trolling to a whole new level.

  • 3 lat temu

    kvlc

    Unfortunately the best game of the tournament is probably behind us already, but I'm hoping for a strong show from Aronian tomorrow.

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